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Grief: Helping Parents with Grieving Children
Grieving Children continuing education social worker CEUs

CEU Answer Booklet
Psychologist CEs, Counselor CEUs, Social Worker CEUs, MFT CEUs

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Audio Transcript Questions The answer to Question 1 is found in Track 1 of the Course Content. The Answer to Question 2 is found in Track 2 of the Course Content… and so on. Select correct answer from below. Place letter on the blank line before the corresponding question. Do not add any spaces.
Important Note! Numbers below are links to that Section. If you close your browser (i.e. Explorer, Firefox, Chrome, etc..) your answers will not be retained. So write them down for future work sessions.

Questions:
1. What are four ways parents can introduce a child to an expected death?
2. What are the three key concepts of death?
3. What are the three phases of adolescence?
4. What are 6 common features of filicide?
5. What are the four methods for reestablishing security?
6. What are the second and third of the five challenges of a grieving child?
7. What are the fourth and fifth challenges of a grieving child?
8. What are the six risk factors of complicated mourning?
9. What are the six signs of complicated mourning?
10. What are two types of death which can be difficult to explain to children?
11. What are some coping strategies that can be used by stepfamilies with grieving children?
12. What are the five points we discussed regarding the terminally ill?
13. What are the four topics we discussed regarding funerals?
14. What are the three topics we discussed regarding burials and cremation?

Answers:
A. The three phases of adolescence are early adolescence, middle adolescence, and late adolescence.
B. The 6 common features of filicide are first children, aged less than 7 months, suffering from seizures or apnea, recent hospital discharge, time of death, and mothers who smoke.
C. The six signs of complicated mourning are continuous hyperactivity, ongoing and significant changes in performance, persistent regression, ongoing depression, self-destructive behavior and chronic anger.   
D. The fourth and fifth challenges of a grieving child are staying connected and resuming childhood. 
E. Coping strategies that can be used by stepfamilies with grieving children working on connections, learning about grief, honest communication, spending time separately or sharing struggles.
F. The three key concepts of death are “nonfunctionality” of the body, death is final and death is universal.  
G. (1) suicide and (2) murder.
H.  Four ways parents can introduce a child to an expected death are taking a death history, using correct language, reading about death with the child, and looking for death education opportunities. 
I. The second and third of the five challenges of a grieving child are understanding death and mourning death.
J. The six risk factors of complicated mourning are traumatic deaths, the caretaker is not functioning well, the child had a love-hate relationship with the deceased, the child experienced multiple losses, the deceased had an extensive illness, and the child has other mental health issues.
K. The four methods for reestablishing security are actively manage the level of change in the child’s life, actively increase the level of predictability in the child’s life, deal with any of the child’s health concerns, and increase the child’s feelings of control. 
L. Five points we considered regarding the terminally ill are whether or not the grieving child wants to visit the terminally ill, preparing the child for the visit, taking a gift, limiting time, and the benefits of involving a child in terminal illness.
M. Three topics we discussed regarding burials and cremation are how to explain a burial, how to explain a cremation, and spending time with a body prior to cremation. 
N. (1) funerals help children accept the reality of death, (2) what if the body isn’t presentable, (3) preparing a child for a funeral, and  (4) when not to take a child to a funeral

Course Content Manual Questions The Answer to Question 15 is found in Section 15 of the Course Content… and so on. Select correct answer from below. Place letter on the blank line before the corresponding question.
Important Note! Numbers below are links to that Section. If you close your browser (i.e. Explorer, Firefox, Chrome, etc..) your answers will not be retained. So write them down for future work sessions.

Questions:
15. According to Busch and Kimble, which of the three concepts of death do children have the most difficulty understanding? 
16. According to Goldman, why is it important to avoid using clichés associated with grieving when speaking to a child about death?  
17. What adult in a child’s life is often most aware of the child’s pain? 
18. Under what circumstances might a parent consider seeking a professional for their grieving child? 
19. At approximately 7 to 11 years of age, what will cause a grieving child to need continual validation of his or her own thoughts? 
20. What five core issues must be addressed for a mental health professional to organize an adolescent’s adjustment to loss? 
21. Why does the loss of a maternal relationship cause daughters to experience greater levels of grief than sons? 
22. According to Riches & Dawson, what are some benefits derived from the daughter carrying out tasks previously undertaken by the deceased mother?
23. According to Doka, what is disenfranchised grief?
24. What three factors construct a personal stamp or certain point of view on understanding death for adolescents? 
25. What is one of the most damaging things that can be done with a grieving child?
26. What are Worden's four tasks of mourning? 

Answers
A.  Daughters experience greater levels of grief due to the central importance of relationships to a woman’s identity.
B.  One of the most damaging things that can be done is to send the child away to visit someone until the funeral and initial grieving process is over. This not only makes the child feel disenfranchised from the family unit, but also does not allow for a sense of understanding of death, even if that understanding is rudimentary. 
C. Children have difficulty understanding the third concept of non-functionality.
D. Children can misinterpret language at different developmental stages. The young child can misunderstand clichés associated with grieving, and these clichés can actually block the grieving process.
E.  Disenfranchised grief is used to refer to losses that cannot be openly acknowledged, socially sanctioned, or publicly mourned.
F.  A teacher
G.  The five core issues that must be addressed: emotionally separating from parents, developing a sense of mastery and control, establishing a sense of belonging, developing a positive self-image, and creating a sense of fairness and justice.
H.  She avoids facing ambivalent feelings towards the deceased mother, avoids facing memories of recent disagreements or anxieties of life without her, and structures her thoughts through concrete activities. A kind of symbiosis might be achieved whereby for a short time at least, both primary and secondary losses are compensated for by father and daughter concentrating on `restoring' their lives through keeping the family functioning. 
I.  (1) to accept the death of the loved one, (2) to uncover and endure the pain inherent in the grieving process, (3) to adapt to an environment in which the loved one is absent, and (4) to reconnect with the deceased in a way that the mourner is able to continue with life.
J.  Grief is normal, but if emotional or behavioral problems seem extreme, if they persist beyond six months, or if they interfere with any aspect of functioning, consider contacting a professional.
K.  (a) engaging in both life affirmation and death acknowledgment, (b) questioning and assuming different belief systems regarding death and the afterlife prior to settling onto a more permanent value system, and (c) incorporating the very reality of personal mortality into their evolving sense of identity.
L.  A child's egocentrism will cause continued need to validate his or her own thoughts. The impact of this thinking upon how a child of this age views death is an awareness of the finality of death and the fear of how the death personally affects her own life.


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