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Enhancing Your Therapy with Gestalt Approaches
Gestalt Therapy continuing education MFT CEUs

Section 28
Bibliography & Selected Readings/ Authors/ Instructors

CEU Answer Booklet | Table of Contents
| Gestalt
Counselor CEUs, Psychologist CEs, Social Worker CEUs, MFT CEUs

If you would like additional information on this topic,
below are OPTIONAL books to consider buying for your personal library...

- Barber, Paul. Living Gestalt Moments with Anna A Spiritual Journey through Alzheimer's. Gestalt Review. 2013, Vol. 17 Issue 3, p214-228. 15p.

- Çakır, Armağan Emre; Gestalt Ontology in International Relations: The Case of European Integration; International Studies Perspectives, 2009-08, Vol. 10 Issue 3

- Cole, Peter. In the Shadow of the Leader: Power, Reflection, and Dialogue in Gestalt Group Therapy. Gestalt Review. 2013, Vol. 17 Issue 2, p178-188. 11p.

- du Plock, Simon; Handbook for Theory, Research, and Practice in Gestalt Therapy; Existential Analysis: Journal of the Society for Existential Analysis, 2009-07, Vol. 20 Issue 2

- Fletcher, Teresa B.; Hinkle, J. Scott; Adventure Based Counseling: An Innovation in Counseling; Journal of Counseling & Development, Summer2002, Vol. 80 Issue 3

- Fischer, Susan L. The Gestalt Profession: An Open System. Gestalt Review. 2013, Vol. 17 Issue 3, p210-213. 4p.

- Jacobs, Susanne; Humour in Gestalt Therapy – Curative Force and Catalyst for Change: A Case Study; South African Journal of Psychology, 2009-12, Vol. 39 Issue 4

- Levitt, Heidi; Korman, Yifaht; Angus, Lynne; A metaphor analysis in treatments of depression: metaphor as a marker of change; Counselling Psychology Quarterly, Mar2000, Vol. 13 Issue 1

- Lowe Jr., Walter; Detriangulation of Absent Fathers in Single-Parent Black Families: Techniques of Imagery; American Journal of Family Therapy, Jan-Mar2000, Vol. 28 Issue 1

- Mills, Letty J.; Daniluk, Judith C.; Her Body Speaks: The Experience of Dance Therapy for Women Survivors of Child Sexual Abuse;  Journal of Counseling & Development, Winter2002, Vol. 80 Issue 1

- O'Leary, Eleanor; Nieuwstraten, Inge M.; The exploration of memories in Gestalt reminiscence therapy; Counselling Psychology Quarterly, Jun2001, Vol. 14 Issue 2

- Passons, William R.; Gestalt Approaches in Counseling; Holt, Rineheart and Winston, Inc.: Fort Worth; 1975

- Rhyne, Janie; The Gestalt Approach To Experience, Art, And Art Therapy; American Journal of Art Therapy; Aug2001, Vol. 40 Issue 1

- Roos, Susan. Chronic Sorrow and Ambiguous Loss: Gestalt Methods for Coping with Grief. Gestalt Review. 2013, Vol. 17 Issue 3, p229-239. 11p.

- Servaty-Seib, Heather L.; Connections Between Counseling Theories and Current Theories of Grief and Mourning; Journal of Mental Health Counseling, Apr2004, Vol. 26 Issue 2

- Siampani, Katerina. Incorporating Sandplay Therapy into Gestalt Therapy in the Treatment of Dementia. Gestalt Review. 2013, Vol. 17 Issue 1, p35-58. 24p. 1 Diagram.

- Silvia, Paul J.; Duval, T. Shelley; Objective Self-Awareness Theory: Recent Progress and Enduring Problems; Personality & Social Psychology Review, 2001, Vol. 5 Issue 3

- Somer, Liora; Somer, Eli; Perspectives on the Use of Glass in Therapy; American Journal of Art Therapy, Feb2000, Vol. 38 Issue 3

- Wagemans, Johan; James H. Elder; Michael Kubovy; Stephen E. Palmer; Mary A. Peterson; Manish Singh; and Rüdiger von der Heydt, A Century of Gestalt Psychology in Visual Perception I. Perceptual Grouping and Figure-Ground Organization. National Institute of Health, November 2012, p1-89.

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CEU Answer Booklet for this course | Gestalt
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Table of Contents

The article above contains foundational information. Articles below contain optional updates.
Being in-between: A model of cultural identity negotiation for emerging adult immigrants. - March 15, 2018
This qualitative study explored the cultural identity negotiation of young adult immigrants. Using a grounded theory research design, 10 semistructured interviews were conducted with emerging adult immigrants (EAI), ages 19–27. Results yielded a substantive model of cultural identity negotiation (MCIN) for EAI and posited that One’s Motivation and Sense of Agency to Negotiate Cultural Identity is at the core of how participants navigate their cultural identities. This model included 6 major categories: (a) Family Cultural Rigidity; (b) Connections Specific to Canada; (c) Connection to a Same Cultured Community; (d) Sense of Permanency; (e) Desire to Preserve Culture of Origin; (f) Desire to Fit in to Canadian Culture, as well as 2 overarching factors (Dimension of Time and Dimension of Age), which were found to be influential on participants’ cultural identity negotiation. The model also included the identification of 4 approaches to cultural identity negotiation: (a) Blended; (b) Dual; (c) Disconnected; and (d) Intermediate. The MCIN for EAI is discussed in terms of the current literature on cultural identity formation as well as implications for counseling psychology training and practice. Recommendations for further research are also suggested. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved)
Helping others increases meaningful work: Evidence from three experiments. - May 11, 2017
The aim of the current research was to examine whether manipulating task significance increased the meaningfulness of work among students (Study 1), an online sample of working adults (Study 2), and public university employees (Study 3). In Study 1, students completed a typing task for the benefit of themselves, a charity, or someone they knew would directly benefit from their work. People who worked to benefit someone else, rather than themselves, reported greater task meaningfulness. In Study 2, a representative, online sample of employees reflected on a time when they worked to benefit themselves or someone else at work. Results revealed that people who reflected on working to benefit someone else, rather than themselves, reported greater work meaningfulness. In Study 3, public university employees participated in a community intervention by working as they normally would, finding new ways to help people each day, or finding several new ways to help others on a single day. People who helped others many times in a single day experienced greater gains in work meaningfulness over time. Across 3 experimental studies, we found that people who perceived their work as helping others experienced more meaningfulness in their work. This highlights the potential mechanisms practitioners, employers, and other parties can use to increase the meaningfulness of work, which has implications for workers’ well-being and productivity. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved)
Change in post-traumatic cognitions mediates treatment effects for traumatized youth—A randomized controlled trial. - March 15, 2018
Posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS) are associated with serious impairments in psychological, social, and academic functioning in youth. The aim of this study was to investigate whether changes in posttraumatic cognitions mediate treatment effects. Participants were multitraumatized youth (N = 156, mean age = 15.1 years, range = 10–18; 79.5% girls) randomly assigned to receive trauma-focused cognitive–behavioral therapy (TF-CBT) or treatment-as-usual (TAU). Mixed-effects models were applied to investigate the impact of treatment conditions on posttraumatic cognitions. Mediation analyses were applied to examine whether changes in posttraumatic cognitions mediated the relationship between treatment conditions and outcome in posttraumatic stress symptoms, depressive symptoms, and general mental health. Participants receiving TF-CBT reported significantly lower levels of negative posttraumatic cognitions at the end of treatment compared to participants in TAU. Change in posttraumatic cognitions mediated the treatment effect difference found for PTSS. When the overall change in cognition was divided into early and late changes, it was only the late change that significantly mediated the PTSS treatment effect. A mediation effect of posttraumatic cognitions was also found for the treatment effect difference in depressive symptoms and in general mental health symptoms. Traumatized youth report having many negative posttraumatic cognitions and changes in negative cognitions plays a key role for treatment outcome. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved)
Discrimination, work outcomes, and mental health among women of color: The protective role of womanist attitudes. - March 15, 2018
With a sample of employed women of color (N = 276), we tested the associations of sexist and racist discrimination with poor work outcomes (job-related burnout and turnover intentions) and mental health outcomes (i.e., psychological distress). Drawing from the Theory of Work Adjustment, Organizational Support Theory, and scholarship on discrimination, we tested perceived person-organization (P-O) fit, perceived organizational support, and self-esteem as mediators of the associations of workplace discrimination with the outcomes. Based on intersectionality scholarship, womanist attitudes were tested as a moderator. Participants provided cross-sectional data via an online survey. Latent variable structural equation modeling results indicated that a second-order latent workplace discrimination variable yielded better fit to the data than modeling sexist and racist discrimination separately. Workplace discrimination was directly and indirectly (via the mediating role of self-esteem) associated with higher psychological distress. Furthermore, workplace discrimination was indirectly associated with poor work outcomes through the mediating roles of perceived P-O fit, perceived organizational support, and self-esteem. Last, moderation analyses indicated that higher womanist attitudes weakened the direct association of workplace discrimination with psychological distress. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved)
Associations among psychological distress, high-risk activism, and conflict between ethnic-racial and sexual minority identities in lesbian, gay, bisexual racial/ethnic minority adults. - July 06, 2017
In this brief report, we present results from a study exploring the associations of high-risk activism (HRA) orientation in lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) issues; HRA orientation in racial/ethnic issues; conflicts in allegiances (CIA) between one’s ethnic-racial and sexual minority identities; and anxiety among LGB racial/ethnic minority adults. A racially and ethnically diverse sample of 208 LGB racial/ethnic minority adults (age: M = 27.52, SD = 8.76) completed an online survey. Bivariate correlations showed that HRA orientation in LGB and in racial/ethnic issues, as well as CIA, were each positively associated with anxiety. However, regression analyses indicated that CIA moderated the association between anxiety and HRA orientation in LGB issues (but not racial/ethnic minority issues) such that this association was significant and positive at low levels of CIA and nonsignificant at high levels of CIA. These findings can be used to not only inform psychological practice with this population (e.g., by encouraging practitioners to be more attentive to these issues as potential sources of stress), but also more broadly, as knowledge that can inform the burgeoning psychological literature on collective action. We highlight, for example, the importance of distinguishing between types of activism (i.e., high- vs. low-risk types) in relation to mental health outcomes. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved)

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