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Enhancing Your Therapy with Gestalt Approaches
Gestalt Therapy continuing education MFT CEUs

Section 28
Bibliography & Selected Readings/ Authors/ Instructors

CEU Answer Booklet | Table of Contents
| Gestalt
Counselor CEUs, Psychologist CEs, Social Worker CEUs, MFT CEUs

If you would like additional information on this topic,
below are OPTIONAL books to consider buying for your personal library...

- Barber, Paul. Living Gestalt Moments with Anna A Spiritual Journey through Alzheimer's. Gestalt Review. 2013, Vol. 17 Issue 3, p214-228. 15p.

- Çakır, Armağan Emre; Gestalt Ontology in International Relations: The Case of European Integration; International Studies Perspectives, 2009-08, Vol. 10 Issue 3

- Cole, Peter. In the Shadow of the Leader: Power, Reflection, and Dialogue in Gestalt Group Therapy. Gestalt Review. 2013, Vol. 17 Issue 2, p178-188. 11p.

- du Plock, Simon; Handbook for Theory, Research, and Practice in Gestalt Therapy; Existential Analysis: Journal of the Society for Existential Analysis, 2009-07, Vol. 20 Issue 2

- Fletcher, Teresa B.; Hinkle, J. Scott; Adventure Based Counseling: An Innovation in Counseling; Journal of Counseling & Development, Summer2002, Vol. 80 Issue 3

- Fischer, Susan L. The Gestalt Profession: An Open System. Gestalt Review. 2013, Vol. 17 Issue 3, p210-213. 4p.

- Jacobs, Susanne; Humour in Gestalt Therapy – Curative Force and Catalyst for Change: A Case Study; South African Journal of Psychology, 2009-12, Vol. 39 Issue 4

- Levitt, Heidi; Korman, Yifaht; Angus, Lynne; A metaphor analysis in treatments of depression: metaphor as a marker of change; Counselling Psychology Quarterly, Mar2000, Vol. 13 Issue 1

- Lowe Jr., Walter; Detriangulation of Absent Fathers in Single-Parent Black Families: Techniques of Imagery; American Journal of Family Therapy, Jan-Mar2000, Vol. 28 Issue 1

- Mills, Letty J.; Daniluk, Judith C.; Her Body Speaks: The Experience of Dance Therapy for Women Survivors of Child Sexual Abuse;  Journal of Counseling & Development, Winter2002, Vol. 80 Issue 1

- O'Leary, Eleanor; Nieuwstraten, Inge M.; The exploration of memories in Gestalt reminiscence therapy; Counselling Psychology Quarterly, Jun2001, Vol. 14 Issue 2

- Passons, William R.; Gestalt Approaches in Counseling; Holt, Rineheart and Winston, Inc.: Fort Worth; 1975

- Rhyne, Janie; The Gestalt Approach To Experience, Art, And Art Therapy; American Journal of Art Therapy; Aug2001, Vol. 40 Issue 1

- Roos, Susan. Chronic Sorrow and Ambiguous Loss: Gestalt Methods for Coping with Grief. Gestalt Review. 2013, Vol. 17 Issue 3, p229-239. 11p.

- Servaty-Seib, Heather L.; Connections Between Counseling Theories and Current Theories of Grief and Mourning; Journal of Mental Health Counseling, Apr2004, Vol. 26 Issue 2

- Siampani, Katerina. Incorporating Sandplay Therapy into Gestalt Therapy in the Treatment of Dementia. Gestalt Review. 2013, Vol. 17 Issue 1, p35-58. 24p. 1 Diagram.

- Silvia, Paul J.; Duval, T. Shelley; Objective Self-Awareness Theory: Recent Progress and Enduring Problems; Personality & Social Psychology Review, 2001, Vol. 5 Issue 3

- Somer, Liora; Somer, Eli; Perspectives on the Use of Glass in Therapy; American Journal of Art Therapy, Feb2000, Vol. 38 Issue 3

- Wagemans, Johan; James H. Elder; Michael Kubovy; Stephen E. Palmer; Mary A. Peterson; Manish Singh; and Rüdiger von der Heydt, A Century of Gestalt Psychology in Visual Perception I. Perceptual Grouping and Figure-Ground Organization. National Institute of Health, November 2012, p1-89.

 
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CEU Answer Booklet for this course | Gestalt
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The article above contains foundational information. Articles below contain optional updates.
Intersectionality research in counseling psychology. - October 19, 2017
This article introduces the special section on intersectionality research in counseling psychology. Across the 4 manuscripts that constitute this special section, a clear theme emerges: a need to return to the roots and politics of intersectionality. Importantly, the 2 empirical articles in this special section (Jerald, Cole, Ward, & Avery, 2017; Lewis, Williams, Peppers, & Gadson, 2017) are studies of Black women’s experiences: a return, so to speak, to the subject positions and social locations from which intersectionality emanates. Shin et al. (2017) explore why this focus on Black feminist thought and social justice is so important by highlighting the persistent weaknesses in how much research published in leading counseling psychology journals has tended to use intersectionality as a way to talk about multiple identities, rather than as a framework for critiquing systemic, intersecting forms of oppression and privilege. Shin and colleagues also point to the possibilities intersectionality affords us when scholars realize the transformative potential of this critical framework. Answers to this call for transformative practices are foregrounded in Moradi and Grzanka’s (2017) contribution, which surveys the interdisciplinary literature on intersectionality and presents a series of guidelines for using intersectionality responsibly. We close with a discussion of issues concerning the applications of intersectionality to counseling psychology research that spans beyond the contributions of each manuscript in this special section. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved)
The intersectionality framework and identity intersections in the Journal of Counseling Psychology and The Counseling Psychologist: A content analysis. - October 19, 2017
The framework of intersectionality is a powerful analytical tool for making sense of how interlocking systems of privilege and oppression are experienced by individuals and groups. Despite the long history of the concept, intersectionality has only recently gained attention in psychology. We conducted a content analysis to assess counseling psychology’s engagement with an intersectional perspective. All articles published in the Journal of Counseling Psychology (n = 4,800) and The Counseling Psychologist (n = 1,915) from their first issues until July 2016 were reviewed to identify conceptual and empirical work focused on intersectionality. A total of 40 articles were identified and examined for themes. Limitations and future directions are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved)
Applying intersectionality to explore the relations between gendered racism and health among Black women. - October 19, 2017
The purpose of this study was to apply an intersectionality framework to explore the influence of gendered racism (i.e., intersection of racism and sexism) on health outcomes. Specifically, we applied intersectionality to extend a biopsychosocial model of racism to highlight the psychosocial variables that mediate and moderate the influence of gendered racial microaggressions (i.e., subtle gendered racism) on health outcomes. In addition, we tested aspects of this conceptual model by exploring the influence of gendered racial microaggressions on the mental and physical health of Black women. In addition, we explored the mediating role of coping strategies and the moderating role of gendered racial identity centrality. Participants were 231 Black women who completed an online survey. Results from regression analyses indicated that gendered racial microaggressions significantly predicted both self-reported mental and physical health outcomes. In addition, results from mediation analyses indicated that disengagement coping significantly mediated the link between gendered racial microaggressions and negative mental and physical health. In addition, a moderated mediation effect was found, such that individuals who reported a greater frequency of gendered racial microaggressions and reported lower levels of gendered racial identity centrality tended to use greater disengagement coping, which in turn, was negatively associated with mental and physical health outcomes. Findings of this study suggest that gendered racial identity centrality can serve a buffering role against the negative mental and physical health effects of gendered racism for Black women. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved)
Controlling images: How awareness of group stereotypes affects Black women’s well-being. - October 19, 2017
This paper presents research exploring how stereotypes that are simultaneously racialized and gendered affect Black women. We investigated the mental and physical health consequences of Black women’s awareness that others hold these stereotypes and tested whether this association was moderated by the centrality of racial identity. A structural equation model tested among 609 young Black women revealed that metastereotype awareness (i.e., being aware that others hold negative stereotypes of one’s group) predicted negative mental health outcomes (e.g., depression, anxiety, hostility), which, in turn, predicted diminished self-care behaviors and greater drug and alcohol use for coping. High racial centrality exacerbated the negative association between metastereotype awareness and self-care. We discuss implications of the findings for clinical practice and for approaches to research using intersectionality frameworks. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved)
Using intersectionality responsibly: Toward critical epistemology, structural analysis, and social justice activism. - October 19, 2017
The increasing popularity of the concept of intersectionality in the social sciences, including in psychology, represents an opportunity to reflect on the state of stewardship of this concept, its roots, and its promise. In this context, the authors aim to promote responsible stewardship of intersectionality and to tip the momentum of intersectionality’s flourishing toward fuller use and engagement of its roots and promise for understanding and challenging dynamics of power, privilege, and oppression. To this end, this article provides a set of guidelines for reflection and action. The authors organize these guidelines along 3 major formulations of intersectionality: intersectionality as a field of study, as analytic strategy or disposition, and as critical praxis for social justice. Ultimately, the authors call for expanding the use of intersectionality toward fuller engagement with its roots in Black feminist thought, its current interdisciplinary richness and potential, and its central aims to challenge and transform structures and systems of power, privilege, and oppression. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved)

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