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Autism: Family Life - Tactics for Getting Normal Again
Autism continuing education psychology CEUs

Section 19
Bibliography of Selected Readings/ Authors/ Instructors

CEU Answer Booklet | Table of Contents
| Autism
Counselor CEUs, Social Worker CEUs, Psychologist CEs, MFT CEUs

If you would like additional information on this topic,
below are OPTIONAL books to consider buying for your personal library...

 

- Boyd, Brian, Examining the relationship between stress and lack of social support in mothers of children with autism, Focus on Autism & Other Developmental Disabilities, Winter 2002, Vol. 17, Issue 4.

- Bloch, Judith S. & Joan D. Weinstein, Families of Young Children with Autism; Social Work in Mental Health, 2010, Vol. 8, Issue 1, p 23


- DiSalvo, Carla & Donald Oswald; Peer-Mediated interventions to increase the social interaction of children with autism: consideration of peer expectancies; Focus on Autism & Other Developmental Disabilities, Winter 2002, Vol. 17, Issue 4.

- Ellawadi, Allison Bean; Weismer, Susan Ellis. Assessing Gestures in Young Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder. Journal of Speech, Language & Hearing Research. Apr2014, Vol. 57 Issue 2, p524-531. 8p. 3 Charts. DOI: 10.1044/2013_JSLHR-L-12-0244.

- Fein, Deborah; Barton, Marianne; Eigsti, Inge-Marie; Kelley, Elizabeth; Naigles, Letitia; Schultz, Robert T.; Stevens, Michael; Helt, Molly; Orinstein, Alyssa; Rosenthal, Michael; Troyb, Eva; Tyson, Katherine. Optimal outcome in individuals with a history of autism. Journal of Child Psychology & Psychiatry. Feb2013, Vol. 54 Issue 2, p195-205. 11p. 1 Diagram, 7 Charts. DOI: 10.1111/jcpp.12037.

-Franco, Jessica H.; Davis, Barbara L.; Davis, John L. Increasing Social Interaction Using Prelinguistic Milieu Teaching With Nonverbal School-Age Children With Autism. American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology. Aug2013, Vol. 22 Issue 3, p489-502. 14p. 4 Charts, 2 Graphs. DOI: 10.1044/1058-0360(2012/10-0103).

- Greenspan, Stanley I., M.C. and Serena Wieder, Ph.D.  Engaging Autism.  Da Capo Press.  Cambridge, MA: 2006.

- Koegel, Lynn Kern, Ph.D. and Claire LaZebnik.  Overcoming Autism.  Viking Penguin.  New York, NY: 2004.

- Koegel, Robert, Koegel, Lynn & Erin McNerney; Pivotal areas in intervention for autism; Journal of Clinical Child Psychology; Fall 2001, Vol. 30, Issue 1.  

- Milshtein, Shahaf, Nurit Yirmiya, David oppenheim, Nina Koren-Karie, & Shlomit Levi, Resolution of the Diagnosis Among Parents of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder: Associations with Child and Parent Characteristics, Journal of Autism & Developmental Disorders, Jan. 2010, Vol. 40, Issue 1, p 89-99

- Mirenda, Pat; Autism, augmentative communication, and assistive technology: what do we really know?; Focus on Autism & Other Developmental Disabilities, Oct. 2000, Vol. 30.

- Murray, Donna S. , Lisa A. Ruble, Heather Willis, & Cynthia A. Molloy, Parent and Teacher Report of Social Skills in Children With Autism Spectrum Disorders, Language, Speech, & Hearing Services in Schools, April 2009, Vol. 40, Issue 2, p 109-115

- Nigam, Ravi; Dynamic assessment of graphic symbol combinations by children with autism; Focus on Autism & Other Developmental Disabilities, Fall 2001, Vol. 16, Issue 3.

- Reddy, Vasudevi, Williams, Emma & Amy Vaughan, Sharing humour and laughter in autism and down's syndrome, British Journal of Psychology, May 2002, Vol. 93, Issue 2.

- Rogers, SJ, Interventions that facilitate socialization in children with autism, Journal of Autism and Development Disorders, Oct 2000, Vol. 30.

- Shore, Stephen, Screening, The language of music: working with children on the autism spectrum; Journal of Education; 2002; Vol. 183; Issue 2.

- Siegel, Bryna, Ph.D.  The World of the Autistic Child.  Oxford University Press.  Oxford, NY: 1996.

- Srinivasan, Sudha M.; Pescatello, Linda S.; Bhat, Anjana N. Current Perspectives on Physical Activity and Exercise Recommendations for Children and Adolescents With Autism Spectrum Disorders. Physical Therapy. Jun2014, Vol. 94 Issue 6, p875-889. 15p. 1 Diagram, 5 Charts. DOI: 10.2522/ptj.20130157.

- Storch, Eric A.; Arnold, Elysse B.; Lewin, Adam B.; Nadeau, Josh M.; Jones, Anna M.; Nadai, Alessandro S. De; Mutch, P. Jane; Selles, Robert R.; Ung, Danielle; Murphy, Tanya K., The Effect of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy Versus Treatment as Usual for Anxiety in Children With Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Randomized, Controlled Trial., Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry. Feb2013, Vol. 52 Issue 2, p132-142. 11p.

- Tarakeshwar, Nalini, & Kenneth Pargament, Religious coping in families of children with autism, Focus on Autism & Other Developmental Disabilities, Winter 2001, Vol. 16, Issue 4.

- Vanderbilt Evidence-based Practice Center. (2014). Therapies for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder: Behavioral Interventions Update. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality.

- Wacker, David; Lee, John; Padilla Dalmau, Yaniz; Kopelman, Todd; Lindgren, Scott; Kuhle, Jennifer; Pelzel, Kelly; Dyson, Shannon; Schieltz, Kelly; Waldron, Debra. Conducting Functional Communication Training via Telehealth to Reduce the Problem Behavior of Young Children with Autism. Journal of Developmental & Physical Disabilities. Feb2013, Vol. 25 Issue 1, p35-48. 14p. DOI: 10.1007/s10882-012-9314-0

 
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CEU Answer Booklet for this course | Autism
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ECHO Autism Transition: Enhancing healthcare for adolescents and young adults with autism spectrum disorder
Autism, Ahead of Print.
Transition-age youth and young adults with autism spectrum disorder have complex healthcare needs, yet the current healthcare system is not equipped to adequately meet the needs of this growing population. Primary care providers lack training and confidence in caring for youth and young adults with autism spectrum disorder. The current study developed and tested an adaptation of the Extension for Community Healthcare Outcomes model to train and mentor primary care providers (n = 16) in best-practice care for transition-age youth and young adults with autism spectrum disorder. The Extension for Community Healthcare Outcomes Autism Transition program consisted of 12 weekly 1-h sessions connecting primary care providers to an interdisciplinary expert team via multipoint videoconferencing. Sessions included brief didactics, case-based learning, and guided practice. Measures of primary care provider self-efficacy, knowledge, and practice were administered pre- and post-training. Participants demonstrated significant improvements in self-efficacy regarding caring for youth/young adults with autism spectrum disorder and reported high satisfaction and changes in practice as a result of participation. By contrast, no significant improvements in knowledge or perceived barriers were observed. Overall, the results indicate that the model holds promise for improving primary care providers’ confidence and interest in working with transition-age youth and young adults with autism spectrum disorder. However, further refinements may be helpful for enhancing scope and impact on practice.
Project ImPACT for Toddlers: Pilot outcomes of a community adaptation of an intervention for autism risk
Autism, Ahead of Print.
This study reports child and family outcomes from a community-based, quasi-experimental pilot trial of Project ImPACT for Toddlers that is a parent-mediated, naturalistic, developmental behavioral intervention for children with or at-risk for autism spectrum disorder developed through a research–community partnership. Community early interventionists delivered either Project ImPACT for Toddlers (n = 10) or Usual Care (n = 9) to families based on Part C assigned provider. Twenty-five families participated, with children averaging 22.76 months old (SD = 5.06). Family and child measures were collected at intake, after 3 months of service, and after a 3-month follow-up. Results indicate significantly greater improvements in positive parent–child interactions for Project ImPACT for Toddlers than usual care families, as well as large, but non-significant, effect sizes for Project ImPACT for Toddlers families in children’s social and communication skills.
Self-determination in young adults with autism spectrum disorder
Autism, Ahead of Print.
This study examined rates of and contributing factors to self-determination among young adults with autism spectrum disorder. Caregivers of young adults with autism spectrum disorder, 16–25 years, from five Autism Treatment Network sites completed surveys about their young adults’ transition experiences including the American Institutes for Research Self-Determination measure. Data were analyzed using univariate and multivariate analysis. Caregivers (n = 479) reported their young adults with autism spectrum disorder as having moderate overall self-determination (x = 38; standard deviation = 9.04) with low capacity (x = 15.3; standard deviation = 5.67) and high opportunities at home (x = 23.1; standard deviation = 4.59). Young adults with autism spectrum disorder with intellectual disability or severe autism spectrum disorder symptomology experience significant disparities in overall self-determination compared to those without intellectual disability and less frequent symptom expression and severity. Barring severity indicators, there were few significant predictors of self-determination. Findings show a breakdown in self-determination skill-building. Young adults with autism spectrum disorder with intellectual disability or severe symptomology experienced significant disparities in self-determination. These findings show that current promotion of self-determination is not meeting the needs of young adults with autism spectrum disorder. Future interventions must identify what supports young adults with autism spectrum disorder need to capitalize on these opportunities to be independent and exert autonomy in their daily lives.
Prevalence and determinants of motor stereotypies in autism spectrum disorder: A systematic review and meta-analysis
Autism, Ahead of Print.
Stereotypies are frequently reported in people with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) but remain one of the less explained phenomena. We aimed to describe, through a systematic review and a meta-analysis, the prevalence of motor stereotypies in ASD and study the factors that influence this prevalence. Our literature search included MEDLINE, Scopus, and PsycINFO databases. Quality and risk of bias were assessed. Thirty-seven studies were included and the median prevalence of motor stereotypies in ASD was 51.8%, ranging from 21.9% to 97.5%. The most frequent determinants associated with a higher number of stereotypies in ASD were a younger age, lower intelligence quotient, and a greater severity of ASD. Moreover, gender did not seem to influence the prevalence of stereotypies. Meta-analytic analysis showed that lower IQ and autism diagnosis (independent of IQ) are associated with a higher prevalence of motor stereotypies (odds ratio = 2.5 and 4.7, respectively). Limitations of the reviewed literature include the use of convenience samples, with small sizes and heterogeneous inclusion criteria, and the predominance of high-functioning autism individuals.
Emotional functioning and the development of internalizing and externalizing problems in young boys with and without autism spectrum disorder
Autism, Ahead of Print.
Children with autism spectrum disorder are at risk of developing internalizing and externalizing problems. However, information on early development of behavior problems and the contributing role of emotional functioning in preschool children with autism spectrum disorder is scarce. This study collected data of boys with and without autism spectrum disorder (N = 156; age: 2–6 years) over three consecutive years (three waves), about their internalizing and externalizing symptoms and emotional functioning (i.e. emotion control, recognition, and vocabulary), using parent-report questionnaires. No age effect was found on internalizing or externalizing problems for boys with and without autism spectrum disorder. Boys with autism spectrum disorder displayed more behavior problems than their typically developing peers and showed lower levels of emotional functioning. Better emotion control and improved emotion recognition were associated with a decrease in problem behaviors for boys with and without autism spectrum disorder, whereas improved emotion vocabulary was uniquely related to a decrease in externalizing problems in boys with autism spectrum disorder. Our findings suggest that boys with and without autism spectrum disorder showed similar developmental courses of internalizing and externalizing problems. However, lower levels of emotional functioning were already more pronounced in boys with autism spectrum disorder at a young age. This contributes to higher levels of behavior problems.

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