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Interventions for Clients Coping with Cancer
Interventions for Clients Coping with Cancer - 10 CEUs

CEU Answer Booklet
Psychologist CEs, Counselor CEUs, Social Worker CEUs, MFT CEUs

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Audio Transcript Questions The answer to Question 1 is found in Track 1 of the Course Content. The Answer to Question 2 is found in Track 2 of the Course Content… and so on. Select correct answer from below. Place letter on the blank line before the corresponding question. Do not add any spaces.
Important Note! Numbers below are links to that Section. If you close your browser (i.e. Explorer, Firefox, Chrome, etc..) your answers will not be retained. So write them down for future work sessions.

Questions:
1. What are four factors that affect how a client copes with cancer?
2. What are three issues regarding dealing with discovery?
3. How does the stop awfulizing technique work?
4. What are four steps to beating cancer?
5. What are four steps to taking charge of treatment?
6. What are three questions which you can ask a client to help them determine if an emotion is realistic and appropriate?
7. What are the two steps to the "act as if" technique?
8. What is a third approach to reforming negative emotions?
9. What are three factors which can influence or result in hopelessness?
10. What are three reasons for making plans for the future?
11. What are three techniques for breaking the news of cancer?
12. What are three hospital strategies?
13. What is a useful technique for clients who are beginning to give in to the idea that he or she may not recover from cancer?
14. What is the first step toward recovery after remission?

Answers:
A.  Three techniques for breaking the news will include timing, delegation and methods for telling children. 
B.  The two steps are choosing the reaction which best serves the client’s interests and acting as if that is the way it feels.
C.  A third approach to reforming negative emotions is controlling the intensity of the unpleasant emotion. 
D.  A useful technique for clients who are beginning to give in to the idea that he or she may not recover from cancer is the take the opposite track technique.
E.  Four factors that affect how well clients cope with cancer are the disease itself, stage of life, resources, values, and emotional patterns of the client, and social support. 
F.  Three issues regarding dealing with discovery are denial, anger, and sense of loss. 
G.  The first step toward recovery after remission is to reconcile with the idea of being healthy again.
H.  The four steps to taking charge are defining the team leader, avoiding the surrender of leadership, using visualization to take chare, and evaluation and substitution. 
I.  What is actually your concern?   Is your emotion based on this one event alone or on prior experiences as well? and If you perceive abandonment again, how badly will you be hurt? 
J.  The three factors which can influence or result in hopelessness are myths about cancer, type of cancer, and intuition. 
K.  The stop awfulizing technique works by allowing the client to avoid engaging the mind in battle, by simply letting go, and thereby quieting the client’s emotions.
L.  Four steps to beating cancer are confront fears, take charge, know options, and fight back. 
M.  Three reasons for making plans for the future are it is fun, making plans for the future counteracts the giving up instruction clients may have unconsciously been giving the body, and clients may be instructing the body to do everything it can to be around when that day comes, and there’s precedent that the body may comply with those instructions.
N.  Three strategies included on this track are decorating with things from home, requesting what you want, and saying no. 

Course Content Manual Questions The Answer to Question 15 is found in Section 15 of the Course Content… and so on. Select correct answer from below. Place letter on the blank line before the corresponding question.
Important Note! Numbers below are links to that Section. If you close your browser (i.e. Explorer, Firefox, Chrome, etc..) your answers will not be retained. So write them down for future work sessions.

Questions:
15. Under what circumstances are women with breast and ovarian cancer more likely to die?
16. What is the benefit of support groups for cancer patients?
17. In Al-Ghazal et al.’s study, what were the differences in body image between women who immediately underwent reconstructive surgery compared to women who underwent delayed reconstruction?
18. According to Reaby, what were the differences in the decision-making styles of women who opted for reconstructive surgery and those who didn’t?
19. According to Spiegel & Cordova, what treatment technique was associated with reduced distress and longer survival? 
20. What four benefits did Yalom suggest group psychotherapy offers that is not available in individual settings?
21. What is the ultimate goal of meaning-centered group psychotherapy with cancer patients?  
22. According to Weisman, what are the four psychosocial stages that cancer patients experience?
23. According to Miller & Harvey, what is the Huxleyan danger of positive psychology?
24. According to Dobkin & Costa, what is the difference between supportive and structured psycho-education interventions in group psychotherapy?
25. According to Cunningham & Oreher, what did the negative fighting spirit finding lead Watson and colleagues to say? 
26. According to Frankl, how are humor and beauty avenues for transcendence?

Answers
A. (1) a sense of universality among otherwise isolated people who may feel shunned because of their illness, (2) a feeling of helping oneself by helping others, (3) hopefulness fostered by seeing how others have coped successfully with difficult issues, and (4) a general sense of belonging to a larger group.
B.  There is the Huxleyan danger that a positive psychology, in its quest to focus on the more uplifting qualities of the human experience, will ignore those events that cause us to be "broken" and in need of a "mental cure."
C. If they are unmarried or isolated or say that they lack intimate friends. Or, if they had recently suffered a death in the family, divorce, or a financial crisis.
D.  The negative fighting spirit finding led Watson and colleagues to say, with a seeming sigh of relief, that patients need not feel scared or guilty if they cannot maintain a fighting spirit, since it probably does not help them much anyway.
E. Humor gains distance from one's situation and beauty helps to experience oneself as part of something bigger, such as is the case in love or the experience of art or nature.
F. The approach encouraged a direct confrontation with fears of dying and death, and the expression of all emotions: fear, sadness, anger, joy, and others, in a supportive group setting.
G. Women who had undergone immediate reconstruction reported significantly superior body image scores than those who underwent delayed reconstruction.
H.  Supportive interventions encourage patients to acknowledge their experiences and express their emotions with other patients, psycho-education interventions use cognitive and behavioural techniques to allow improvements in patients' adaptation to disease via learning coping skills and stress reduction techniques (e.g. relaxation training).
I.  (a) the "existential plight" stage--a period of about 100 days beginning with the diagnosis and extending through primary treatment; (b) the "mitigation and accommodation" stage--when the patient's behavior is the psychosocial equivalent of having the disease, even during remission; (c) the "decline and deterioration" stage; and (d) the "preterminality and terminality" stage.
J. Support groups allow cancer patients to talk about their illness and treatment, to express and manage fears of isolation and death, and to receive empathy and advice from others going through the same experience
K. Most women electing not to have reconstructive surgery were classified as `sideliners' -- choosing the alternative that was the simplest to implement. These women made rapid, conflict-free decisions but were prone to regret at a later date. None of the reconstruction patients made their decision in this way, tending instead to demonstrate the `contented' pattern -- having a strong preference for reconstruction based on individual personal needs and showing little regret.
L. The ultimate goal is to help men and women with advanced cancer focus on what has been, and can still be, meaningful in their lives given their circumstances, and to further develop their ability to reframe their experience from that of dying to that of living despite the threat of dying.


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