Sponsored by the HealthcareTrainingInstitute.org providing Quality Education since 1979
Add to Shopping Cart

Strategies for Battered Women
Battered Women continuing education social worker CEUs

Section 17
Do Batterer Programs Really Work?

Question 17 | Test | Table of Contents | Domestic Violence
Social Worker CEs, Psychologist CEs, Counselor CEs, MFT CEs

To know whether batterer programs work, one must first decide what “work” means. Most studies have used a criterion of complete cessation of violence (Tolman & Edleson, 1995). Some focus on reducing violence, rather than eliminating it (e.g., Poynter, 1989), often because it is easier to demonstrate reducing versus eliminating violence. Some authors (Edleson, 1995; Tolman & Bennett, 1990) caution against focusing on reduction, however, because a perpetrator could reduce his violence and still be dangerous to his partner. A few studies have focused on psychological variables, such as anger and jealousy, and have not actually measured violence after treatment at all (Saunders & Hanusa, 1986).

Areas Needing Greater Attention

Some providers have argued that greater attention needs to be paid to threats, other forms of psychological aggression (Rosenfeld, 1992; Tolman & Edleson, 1995), and sexual aggression. Few studies have incorporated such measures, however (Harrell, 1991, and Poynter, 1989, are exceptions). It has also been suggested that measures of increases in positive and caring behaviors of perpetrators and well­being of partners and children should be included as measures of outcome (Tolman & Edleson, 1995). Few studies have considered whether a decrease in some kinds of abusive behaviors, but increases in others, still qualifies as success (Gondoif, 1995). Some authors (Gondolf, 1987b) propose that true success would involve former perpetrators joining the social movement against partner violence. Anecdotal reports indicate that some former perpetrators have, in fact, done just that (Common Purpose, 1996).

Relevant Timeframe
The relevant timeframe is also an important consideration (Gondolf, 1995). How long a period of nonviolence counts as success? Too short a period may not provide an accurate estimate, especially is the perpetrators are also being monitored by parole officers during that period. Too long a period may make follow-ups too difficult.

- Roberts, A. R., PhD. (1998). Battered Women and Their Families. Springer Publishing Company: New York.

Online Continuing Education QUESTION 17
What criterion do most studies use to determine if a batterer program is successful? Record the letter of the correct answer the Test.

 
Others who bought this Domestic/Partner Violence Course
also bought…

Scroll DownScroll UpCourse Listing Bottom Cap

Test for this course | Domestic Violence
Forward to Section 18
Table of Contents
Top

Continuing Education for
Social Work, Psychology, Counselor, MFT


OnlineCEUcredit.com Login


Forget your Password Reset it!