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Talking to Teens about Sex & Sexting Ethical Boundaries

CEU Answer Booklet
Psychologist CEs, Counselor CEUs, Social Worker CEUs, MFT CEUs | Adolescence/School

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Audio Transcript Questions The answer to Question 1 is found in Track 1 of the Course Content. The Answer to Question 2 is found in Track 2 of the Course Content… and so on. Select correct answer from below. Place letter on the blank line before the corresponding question. Do not add any spaces.
Important Note! Numbers below are links to that Section. If you close your browser (i.e. Explorer, Firefox, Chrome, etc..) your answers will not be retained. So write them down for future work sessions.

Questions:
1. What are four common misconceptions about sex?
2. What are five consequences of a teen’s deciding to have sex?
3. What are some of the nine elements of being in love?
4. What are the objects of the six kinds of love?
5. What are three steps to avoiding unwanted sexual advances?
6. If a client feels that it might just be easier to give in to sexual advances, what coping strategies could she use?
7. What are three methods for avoiding date rape?
Answers:
A. Unwanted pregnancy, the possibility of disease, unexpected emotional involvement, learning about sexual functioning and learning about sexual responsibility
B. Humankind, God, someone to help, parents, oneself and sexual longing
C. If a client feels that it might just be easier to give in to sexual advances, coping strategies can include responses to pressure lines.
D. Losing virginity as planned, emotional pain, sex will create feelings that aren’t already there, and one you pop, you just can’t stop.
E. Choice, giving, closeness, trust, caring, responsibility, respect, delight and self-awareness.
F. Three steps to avoiding unwanted sexual advances are plan ahead, look for signs of possible problems, and know how to communicate your feelings.  
G. Three methods for avoiding date rape are stay sober, discourage the date from drinking, and don’t give mixed messages.

Course Content Manual Questions The Answer to Question 8 is found in Section 8 of the Course Content… and so on. Select correct answer from below. Place letter on the blank line before the corresponding question.
Important Note! Numbers below are links to that Section. If you close your browser (i.e. Explorer, Firefox, Chrome, etc..) your answers will not be retained. So write them down for future work sessions.

Questions:
8. According to the Codes of Ethics, what is a mental health professional’s responsibility in regards to confidentiality in group work?  
9. What should be the counselors actions regarding a 13-year-old who tells you that she is having sexual relations with her cousin who baby-sits her on nights when her parents are working?
10. What advice may be given to a teen who doesn’t have an urgent problem but wants to open communication about sex with their parents? 
11. What is the mind-body gap and its consequences for adolescent girls? 
12. The poet known as Oni, used what two techniques to teach adolescents about safe sex and STDs? 
13. What was the focus of the four effective interventions for the Health Clinic programs? 
14. Why does Tolman think that cultivating an erotic voice in adolescent girls is so important to sexual education? 
15. Why does Collins believe that there is no “safe sex”? 
16. According to Roffman, why do adolescent girls turn to oral sex?  
17. What were the results of a study of 600 students enrolled at a Midwestern university regarding oral sex?   
Answers:
A.  the soul snap and the rap style known as “slamming”
B.  If girls can know and incorporate their own erotic voices into their relationships and sexual choices, they are no longer "dependable" for bearing the responsibility to control boys' "raging hormones."
C. Advise them to try asking their parents about how they think things have changed for teens since they were young. This keeps the topic away from being specifically about the teen’s sexuality.
D. This is child abuse because the older party is in a custodial role. Consent is irrelevant because the law presumes that the baby sitter has certain caretaker responsibilities that should be honored and has control over the younger party. Report immediately to the proper authority.
E.  There is no "safe sex," because nothing protects us from the self-disgust that can deaden our capacity for real intimacy.
F.  The gap between a girl's physical development and her psychological development. For a young girl, having a well-developed body can raise the stakes at a time when rebellion is becoming the norm. A teenage girl, who has the physical equipment but not the emotional maturity, can turn to sex to prove her independence, often with disastrous results.
G.  Middle-school girls sometimes look at oral sex as an absolute bargain--you don't get pregnant, they think you don't get diseases, you're still a virgin and you're in control since it's something that they can do to boys.
H.  It should be noted that all four of the effective interventions focused on sexual and contraceptive behavior, gave clear messages about appropriate sexual and contraceptive behavior, and included one-on-one consultation about the client's own behavior.
I.  Mental health professionals must clearly communicate to group members that confidentiality cannot be guaranteed in group work.
J.  59% did not believe that oral sex would qualify as sex and only 19% thought the same about anal sex. Females (62%) were more likely than males (56%) to assert that cunnilingus and fellatio were not "sex."


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