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Compulsive Spending: 7 Therapeutic Strategies for the Shop-aholic
Compulsive Spending  continuing education social worker CEUs

CEU Answer Booklet
Psychologist CEs, Counselor CEUs, Social Worker CEUs, MFT CEUs

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Audio Transcript Questions The answer to Question 1 is found in Track 1 of the Course Content. The Answer to Question 2 is found in Track 2 of the Course Content… and so on. Select correct answer from below. Place letter on the blank line before the corresponding question. Do not add any spaces.
Important Note! Numbers below are links to that Section. If you close your browser (i.e. Explorer, Firefox, Chrome, etc..) your answers will not be retained. So write them down for future work sessions.

Questions:
1. What are three factors that exacerbate a compulsive spender’s habits?
2. What are three motivations that shop-aholics have for compulsive spending?
3. What are three techniques to incorporate a shop-aholic partner into their therapy?
4. What are three reactions that can occur when clients are confronted with their compulsive spending?
5. What are three types of malicious spending?
6. What are three techniques useful in preparing a client to fight compulsive spending?
7. What are three techniques that help a client avoid trigger attacks?

Answers:
A. substituting for love and affection; gender-related motivations; and thrill seeking.
B. shame; gender-related reactions; and defensiveness.
C. “Compiling a Money History”; “Conversation with Money”; and “Commentary.”
D. denial; social pressures; and contradicting personalities.
E. destroying inhibitive myths; hoarding questionnaire; supportive detachment; and increasing affection.
F. deliberate lying; cheating; and revenge spending.
G. Trigger Awareness; Spending Alternatives; and Replacement Self-Talk.

Course Content Manual Questions The Answer to Question 8 is found in Section 8 of the Course Content… and so on. Select correct answer from below. Place letter on the blank line before the corresponding question.
Important Note! Numbers below are links to that Section. If you close your browser (i.e. Explorer, Firefox, Chrome, etc..) your answers will not be retained. So write them down for future work sessions.

Questions:
8. What is the diagnostic criteria for compulsive buying? 
9. What must the clinician be aware of when evaluating the shopping habits of a potential compulsive buyer? 
10. For those with compulsive buying disorder, what sensory factors often enhance their shopping experience? 
11. What is the focus of group cognitive-behavioral therapy described by Burgard and Mitchell?
12. What are the two main concepts behind the urge to splurge? 
13. According to Professor Chaplin & John, between what ages do materialist values surge? 
14. Which sex is most likely to enter into a marriage with debt? 
15. According to Twitchell, what are the roots of our (American) ambivalence about materialism?   
16. What were the cardinal signs of compulsive buying examined in the study? 
17. According to Meier, what is the difference between big spenders and experiencers?  

Answers
A.  1) Shopping is an easy way to numb ourselves or boost our self-esteem, even if relief only lasts until buyer's remorse kicks in. A shopaholic will fill her emptiness with "stuff" she doesn't even need. That void, in reality, may be from years of emotional or spiritual deprivation: fear that there's never enough, whether it's money, material objects, recognition or love.  2) Others among us may have simply developed a sense of entitlement, unconscious of the true cost of all those items we bought "at a steal."
B.  Men. 74 percent of men enter marriage with at least some debt as compared to 67% of women.
C. Shoppers often describe their experiences as being enhanced by the colors, sounds, lighting and odor of stores, as well as the textures of clothing.
D. In evaluating the individual, normal shopping and spending behavior must be distinguished from compulsive buying, although it may sometimes be difficult to draw a clear distinction. The clinician must be aware of the inherent differences in shopping behavior of typical men and women, and understand that shopping and spending generally occurs within a cultural context.
E.  The roots of our ambivalence about materialism are essentially religious in nature.
F.  The therapy focuses on factors that maintain the problematic buying behavior, and on strategies for controlling impulsive spending and not on the individual group member’s personal problems.
G.  The cardinal signs of compulsive buying, are intrusive or senseless impulses to buy, frequent purchases of unneeded or unaffordable items, and shopping for longer periods than intended.
H.  Materialistic values (like preferring "nice sports equipment" to "being good at sports") surge between the ages of 8 and 9, and then again between 12 and 13.
I.  (1) frequent preoccupation with buying or impulses to buy that is/are experienced as irresistible, intrusive and/or senseless (2) frequent buying of more than can be afforded, (3) frequent buying of items that are not needed, or shopping for longer periods of time than intended (4) The buying preoccupations, impulses or behaviors cause marked distress, are time consuming, significantly interfere with social or occupational functioning, or result in financial problems (e.g. indebtedness or bankruptcy) and (5) The excessive buying or shopping behavior does not occur exclusively during periods of hypomania or mania
J.  Big spenders are highly materialistic people who enjoy spending money, often view higher prices as a quality signifier, and who enjoy owning nice possessions. In contrast, experiencers are less materialistic individuals who are willing to spend money on such things as travel or fine dining, but do not seek to own expensive or lavish goods.


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