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Coping with Cancer: Interventions for the Family
Cancer & Family continuing education social worker CEUs

CEU Answer Booklet
Psychologist CEs, Counselor CEUs, Social Worker CEUs, MFT CEUs

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Audio Transcript Questions The answer to Question 1 is found in Track 1 of the Course Content. The Answer to Question 2 is found in Track 2 of the Course Content… and so on. Select correct answer from below. Place letter on the blank line before the corresponding question. Do not add any spaces.
Important Note! Numbers below are links to that Section. If you close your browser (i.e. Explorer, Firefox, Chrome, etc..) your answers will not be retained. So write them down for future work sessions.

Questions:
1. What are three common reactions your client may experience when learning that a loved one has cancer?
2. What are 4 common reactions to cancer?
3. Uncertainty training is extremely beneficial for family members.  What cognitions does unproductive worry create?
4. What are five conversation guidelines?
5. What are six guidelines for communication?
6. What are six actions clients can try if they feel they know not what to do?
7. What are three interventions to provide comfort to the caregiver?
8. What are four guidelines for managing cancer in the workplace?
9. What are three interventions for caregiver’s guide to well being? 
10. What are five techniques for mastering the dynamics of anger?
11. What are six interventions that can help foster productive time management?
12. What is one strategy for avoiding obsessive thinking?
13. What are four guidelines for helping your clients as parents dealing with children who are trying to cope with cancer in the family or of a friend or loved one?
14. What are two techniques for child affect integration? 

Answers:
A.  Six interventions that can help foster productive time management are the daily to-do list, direct delegation, familial delegation, Avoiding the Supercaregiver Trap, research services and scheduling phone time. 
B.  Three interventions to provide comfort to the caregiver are not letting the cancer patient be the focus of all conversation, encourage time outs, and avoiding interference.
C.  Four guidelines for managing cancer in the workplace are don’t participate in denial, don’t reduce responsibilities without asking, flexible scheduling, and trouble signs and two steps to effective confrontation. 
D.  Four guidelines for helping your clients as parents dealing with children who are trying to cope with cancer in the family or of a friend or loved one are preparing to tell the children, talking to children about cancer, evaluating reactions, and discussing cancer with multiple children.  
E.  Three common reactions your client may experience when learning that a loved one has cancer are shock, anger, and fear. 
F.  Four common reactions to cancer are a reevaluation of beliefs, the desire to bargain, anxiety, and hope. 
G.  Two techniques for child affect integration are storytelling and playing, and drawing. 
H.  Six guidelines for communication are sometimes it’s best to begin with the facts, say how you feel first, don’t cover up your feelings, avoid judgment, and offer acceptance and support, validation, and cry.
I.  Six actions clients can try if they feel they know not what to do are bringing food, getting the patient involved, helping with chores, helping with out of town guests, calling and visiting, and creating laughter. 
J.  Three interventions for caregiver’s guide to well being are seeking support, understanding and compromise, and handling unwanted advice.
K.  Unproductive worry involves unanswerable questions, chain reactions, unsolvable problems, things that are unknow­able, demands for perfect solutions, relying on anxiety as a guide, and the demand for total control. 
L.  Five conversation guidelines are ask first, if they don’t want to talk, knowing what to say, giving advice, and saying cancer. 
M.  Five techniques for mastering the dynamics of anger are use visualization, talk to yourself and translate the meaning, be empathetic, not defensive, do not allow abuse and using anger to fuel energy in a positive direction.
N.  One strategy for avoiding obsessive thinking is compartmentalizing cancer thoughts.

Course Content Manual Questions The Answer to Question 15 is found in Section 15 of the Course Content… and so on. Select correct answer from below. Place letter on the blank line before the corresponding question.
Important Note! Numbers below are links to that Section. If you close your browser (i.e. Explorer, Firefox, Chrome, etc..) your answers will not be retained. So write them down for future work sessions.

Questions:
15. A life schema is based on what three components?
16. What is the definition of existential and situational meaning?
17. According to Periyakoil and Hallenbeck , what are the clues that a patient is experiencing depression, not preparatory grief?
18. What are the three general coping styles for coping discussed by Livneh in the above article?
19. What is the major difference between engagement and disengagement coping strategies?
20. What four things does Livneh suggest rehabilitation practitioners should focus on?
21. According to St. Clair, what is the ultimate way to resolve pathological attachment?
22. What is the definition of family resilience?
23. When developing a useful family resilience schema, what is considered to be the most important concept?
24. What two negative response types were found most frequently among martial couples coping with cancer?
25. What is Dyadic coping?
26. According to Clay and Suinn, patients that make what kind of changes tend to live longer?

Answers
A. Livneh suggests: (a) enhance more positive attitudes and beliefs in one's ability to challenge the disease; (b) plan and implement strategies to address daily living problems triggered by the functional limitations (e.g., pain, fatigue, nausea) imposed by cancer and its treatment; (c) establish and maintain a supportive social network that includes the client's family, peers, and, when applicable, coworkers; and (d) reframe negative thoughts or pessimistic outlook to foster a more positive view that focuses on one's remaining abilities, realistic goals, and potential future contributions.
B.  Both of these constructs underscore the importance of a shared, positive perception of their family unit among family members dealing with adverse circumstances. The power of viewing adversity in a positive light has long been understood and accepted in family therapy where reframing is a central technique in a host of models.
C. A life schema is based on individual’s views regarding themselves, their set of philosophical or theological beliefs and assumptions about how the world operates or their worldview
D.  Dyadic coping constitutes a couple's efforts to cope conjointly with a common or shared stressor.
E. Psychological changes
F. Disengagement strategies tend to be negative responses to dealing with stress while engagement strategies tend to be more positive responses to stress.
G. The clues are persistant agitation and or hopelessness, no response to social support, Anhedonia, dysphoria, feelings of worthlessness
H.  Negative responses found were: withdrawal and over critical statements.
I.  Family resilience is defined as "characteristics, dimensions, and properties of families which help families be resistant to disruption in the face of change and adaptive in the face of crisis situations." resiliency includes strengths a family utilizes in response to difficulties
J. Existential meaning is expectations generated by the individuals' perception of a new event and their capacity to handle it. Determined by past experiences, they are also influenced by personal beliefs and by the beliefs of other members in the family.  Situational meaning is global representations that influence individuals' perceptions of their place within the world. Determined by preexisting beliefs and by existential meanings, they have both cognitive and emotional elements.
K. The general coping styles are optimism/pessimism, Repression/blunting versus sensitization/monitoring, Approach/avoidance
L. The ultimate way to resolve pathological attachment death of the family member


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